Infosec Weekly Roundup, April 9 – 15 , 2012

How do I stop wireless hackers?

“The security systems used on home wireless systems can be hacked but it’s not an easy matter and requires a fair amount of technical expertise and determination. Provided you are using the highest level of encryption (usually WPA2), with a long passphrase of 25 or more characters, you should be reasonably safe.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/advice/9203183/How-do-I-stop-wireless-hackers.html

Ransomware Encrypts Files of Users of File-Sharing Services, Demands 50-Euro Ransom

This Malware have been observed by several antivirus firms and its not a traditional one as after infecting the computer is starts by encrypting different files to ask the victim to pay cybercriminals 50 euros to get back their files.

“A new scareware preys on people who download movies, music and other pieces using file-sharing services by encrypting files on the victim’s computer and demanding 50 euros in exchange for a code to restore them, according to Bitdefender research.”

http://www.malwarecity.com/blog/ransomware-encrypts-files-of-users-of-file-sharing-services-demands-50-euro-ransom-1280.html

Scotland Yard Denies MI6 Hack Claimed by TeaMp0isoN

MI6 denies the attack claimed by TeaMp0isoN group

“Metropolitan Police representatives deny being hacked by members of TeaMp0isoN. They believe that the recording between the employee of the anti-terrorist hotline and the other law enforcement organization was made via “the receiving handset.””

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Scotland-Yard-Denies-MI6-Hack-Claimed-by-TeaMp0isoN-264418.shtml

Hey Employers–My Facebook Password Is None of Your Business

Never provide any of your personal passwords to any party.

“Some employers are demanding that individuals surrender their Facebook credentials as a condition of being hired. The practice is simply ludicrous, so don’t be one of those employers.”

http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/252514/hey_employersmy_facebook_password_is_none_of_your_business.html

Malware Analysis Tutorial 26: Rootkit Configuration

 “In this section, we go back to the analysis of lz32.dll and finish the rest of it. We will see a wide variety of malicious operations performed by the malicious lz32.dll injected by Max++, including disk formatting of the hidden drive, generation of network payload and configuration, unpacking of code segment, and infection of other system library files.”

http://fumalwareanalysis.blogspot.com/2012/04/malware-analysis-tutorial-26-rootkit.html

That’s all for this week, if you have more information security news please to share them with our readers by sending emails or using the contact form.

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